Men's Process Group

Status: 
Full
Meeting Day and Time: 
Mondays 2 - 3:30 pm
Facilitated By: 
Anthony Teasdale PhD, Chris Wilson MA
Men's Process Group

“Be tough….don’t cry….be a man…compete to win…don’t admit weakness…be in charge” …..are all messages men internalize and act out about how to “be a man.” As a result, men become accustomed to hiding their stresses, worries, and concerns from others, which at times can come at a significant cost, to relationships with others and result in negative coping behaviors by men.  You might ask yourself:

  • Would you like to become more comfortable opening up to others or managing conflict?
  • Do you experience difficulty asking for help or dealing with criticism?
  • Trouble making friends or connecting with others?
  • Are relationships hard to develop or quick to disappear?
  • Want to work on social skills?
  • Issues with family?
  • Do you worry about how others perceive you?

If you answered "yes" to any of these… Men’s Process Group may be a solution!

In Men’s Process Group, members learn how to be more flexible in dealing with life’s challenges in a supportive and safe environment. In group, everyone works together to move toward their goals by providing encouragement to one another, giving and receiving feedback, and experimenting with new ideas and behaviors by learning how to connect to each other in the group. We will explore how trying to live up to a rigid stereotype of masculinity restricts and impedes relationships with family members, romantic partners, and friends. Group members will share struggles, learn better ways to form meaningful relationships, and develop insight about themselves and their relationship patterns. Come be a part of this powerful experience!

This group requires an initial assessment at CAPS. The therapist will help you schedule a brief screening interview to see that the group will adequately address your reasons for coming to the group.

Use the group interest form with questions or to express interest in this group to the facilitator(s).

Image by CDC.gov